Sunday, October 17, 2010

I Grow Old, I Grow Old

Could this article be any more biased?

Bread baking is a "blessing".

Sowing and milking came to Europe with both a "missionary zeal" and "peaceful cooperation." That "peaceful cooperation," however, shows "signs of conflict." The lack of logic doesn't matter when explaining how the patriarchs prevailed.

The early farmers moving into Central Europe were sophisticated compared with these children of nature. The farmers wore different clothing, prayed to other idols and spoke a different language.

Early farmers were more "sophisticated" (aka better than) the "children of nature" who were living in Europe. But both of them prayed to "idols" other than, one assumes, the "true god" of the xians.

The farmers even protected their livestock from outside influences, determined to prevent the wild oxen known as aurochs from breeding with their Middle Eastern cows. They feared that such hybrids would only introduce a new wild element into the domesticated breeds.

Their breeding precautions were completely understandable. The revolutionary idea that man could subjugate plants and animals went hand in hand with enormous efforts, patience and ingenuity. The process took thousands of years.

Of course, the hard-working patriarchialists wouldn't want their "enormous efforts, patience, and ingenuity" to be ruined by those less interested in the "subjugation" of all other life forms.

. Çatalhöyük, known as "man's first metropolis," had about 5,000 inhabitants, who lived in mud huts packed tightly together. They worshipped an obese mother goddess, depicted in statues as a figure sitting on a throne decorated with the heads of carnivores.

Catalhoyuk is "man's" first metropolis and the Goddess worshipped there was "obese."

The settlers, wielding their sickles, kept moving farther and farther north, right into the territory of backward peoples. The newcomers were industrious and used to working hard in the fields.

This is opposed to the "backward peoples" who were not used to "working hard in the fields."

By comparison, the more primitive existing inhabitants of the continent wore animal hides and lived in spartan huts. They looked on in bewilderment as the newcomers deforested their hunting grounds, tilled the soil and planted seeds. This apparently upset them and motivated them to resist the intruders.


At this point, our heroine's head asplodes.

Picture found here.


Souris Optique said...

Oh good grief. It all begins to make perfect sense if you just assume it was written by a high school student.
"This _apparently_ upset them..."
*shakes head*

Steven said...

I wouldn't be too upset about this information. The 'patriarchy' came later, in the form of warrior bands that conquered agriculturalists and made themselves an aristocracy.

The milk-drinkers likely worshipped a goddess. Farmers worship the earth as a fertility goddess. It is the warrior bands, who produce nothing, that worshipped the sky god that we still know today.